Mlk i have a dream speech

I Have a Dream

mlk i have a dream speech

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greates•t demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. Five ~core years ago a.

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In his iconic speech at the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, King urged America to "make real the promises of democracy. I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves [ Audience :] Yeah who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity. But one hundred years later All right , the Negro still is not free. My Lord, Yeah One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.

No one understood the poetry of their parallel moments better than the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. So effective was King in tying the memory of Lincoln to the cause of civil rights that most of us now see the Lincoln Memorial as the obvious site, the holiest of holy places, where history and racial progress meet. Yet, as we shall see, there was nothing inevitable about the choice of the Lincoln Memorial as the logical place for racial protests throughout the early 20th century, or as the staging ground for Dr. No mainstream newspaper covered the attempt to segregate black guests at the dedication or that 21 guests apparently stormed out.



“I Have a Dream …”

I have a dream speech full video - Martin Luther King, Jr

Delivered to over , civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. Beginning with a reference to the Emancipation Proclamation , which freed millions of slaves in , [4] King said "one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free". The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was partly intended to demonstrate mass support for the civil rights legislation proposed by President Kennedy in June. Martin Luther King and other leaders therefore agreed to keep their speeches calm, also, to avoid provoking the civil disobedience which had become the hallmark of the Civil Rights Movement. King originally designed his speech as a homage to Abraham Lincoln 's Gettysburg Address , timed to correspond with the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation. This speech discusses the gap between the American dream and reality, saying that overt white supremacists have violated the dream, and that "our federal government has also scarred the dream through its apathy and hypocrisy, its betrayal of the cause of justice". King suggests that "It may well be that the Negro is God's instrument to save the soul of America.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity. I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

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